The philosophical ethics on friendship from aristotles perspective

Virtues and Deficiencies, Continence and Incontinence Aristotle distinguishes two kinds of virtue a1— Aristotle holds that this same topography applies to every ethical virtue: Friends rely on each other both for support and a sense of personal identity, but also accept that each needs the space to develop relationships with others.

His taxonomy begins with the premise that there are three main reasons why one person might like someone else.

On the other hand, The Nicomachean Ethics continues to be relevant to philosophers today. Neither good theoretical reasoning nor good practical reasoning moves in a circle; true thinking always presupposes and progresses in linear fashion from proper starting points.

Page and line numbers shall henceforth refer to this treatise. He does not long to do something that he regards as shameful; and he is not greatly distressed at having to give up a pleasure that he realizes he should forego.

It recognizes the common qualities which are involved in all particular objects of sensation.

Key Concepts of the Philosophy of Aristotle

Virtuous activity makes The philosophical ethics on friendship from aristotles perspective life happy not by guaranteeing happiness in all circumstances, but by serving as the goal for the sake of which lesser goods are to be pursued. At the same time, Aristotle makes it clear that in order to be happy one must possess others goods as well—such goods as friends, wealth, and power.

We should take note of a further difference between these two discussions: But people mean such different things by the expression that he finds it necessary to discuss the nature of it for himself. The subject area raises such questions as: The argument he develops here is accordingly widely known as "the function argument," and is among the most-discussed arguments made by any ancient philosopher.

Since the inferior partner in an unequal friendship can never make an equal return for the benefits he receives, the problem for Aristotle is to figure out how such inequality can in a sense be equalized.

Aristotle's Ethics

Plato argues that justice should be placed in this category, but since it is generally agreed that it is desirable for its consequences, he devotes most of his time to establishing his more controversial point—that justice is to be sought for its own sake.

Theological conversations with ancient and modern ethics, Notre Dame, Ind.: The cause of this deficiency lies not in some impairment in their capacity to reason—for we are assuming that they are normal in this respect—but in the training of their passions.

In what is perceived to be a more unstable and fluctuating world, men were less likely to expect to find close friends at work: Thus neither of these characteristics is particular to humans. No human appetite or desire is bad if it is controlled by reason according to a moral principle.

These analogies can be taken to mean that the form of akrasia that Aristotle calls weakness rather than impetuosity always results from some diminution of cognitive or intellectual acuity at the moment of action. Suppose we grant, at least for the sake of argument, that doing anything well, including living well, consists in exercising certain skills; and let us call these skills, whatever they turn out to be, virtues.

His taxonomy begins with the premise that there are three main reasons why one person might like someone else. Book VII makes the point that pleasures interfere with each other, and so even if all kinds of pleasures are good, it does not follow that all of them are worth choosing.

Aristotelian ethics

Perhaps a greater difficulty can be raised if we ask how Aristotle determines which emotions are governed by the doctrine of the mean. He takes it for granted that self-love is properly condemned whenever it can be shown to be harmful to the community. Fourthly, it is identical with form when it takes on a form in its actualized and final phase.

Since Aristotle thinks that the pursuit of one's own happiness, properly understood, requires ethically virtuous activity and will therefore be of great value not only to one's friends but to the larger political community as well, he argues that self-love is an entirely proper emotion—provided it is expressed in the love of virtue IX.

If they are equally virtuous, their friendship is perfect. It tells the individual that the good of others has, in itself, no valid claim on him, but that he should serve other members of the community only to the extent that he can connect their interests to his own.

The Human Good and the Function Argument The principal idea with which Aristotle begins is that there are differences of opinion about what is best for human beings, and that to profit from ethical inquiry we must resolve this disagreement.

If one's ultimate end should simply be virtuous activity, then why should it make any difference to one's happiness whether one has or lacks these other types of good?

Ethics I 7 Thus, human beings should aim at a life in full conformity with their rational natures; for this, the satisfaction of desires and the acquisition of material goods are less important than the achievement of virtue.

Thirdly, it is a kind of stuff without specific qualities and so is indeterminate and contingent.

Friendship theory: some philosophical and sociological themes

Again, the epistemology of love is intimately connected to the philosophy of language and theories of the emotions. Nevertheless, like Plato he eventually says that all the highest forms of the moral virtues require each other, and all require intellectual virtue, and in effect that the happiest and most virtuous life is that of a philosopher.Aristotle applied the same patient, careful, descriptive approach to his examination of moral philosophy in the Εθικη Νικομαχοι (Nicomachean Ethics).Here he discussed the conditions under which moral responsibility may be ascribed to individual agents, the nature of the virtues and vices involved in moral evaluation, and the methods of achieving happiness in human life.

Philosophy of Love

The Nicomachean Ethics, Aristotle's most important study of personal morality and the ends of human life, has for many centuries been a widely-read and influential book. Though written more than 2, years ago, it offers the modern reader many valuable insights into human needs and conduct.

Among. Friendship: some philosophical and sociological themes. Many people’s understanding of friendship in northern societies is rather thin. We explore some classical views of friendship, the development of theory and practice in ‘modern’ societies, and some key aspects of the current experience of friendship.

Jun 30,  · Aristotle rejected the idea of Plato’s “Theory of the forms,” which stated that the idealized essence of an object existed apart from that object. Plato thought that physical things were representations of idealized perfect forms that existed on another plane of alethamacdonald.coms: 2.

Philosophy Ethics Aristotle's Ethics. Abstract: Aristotle's ethics is a common sense ethics built on naturalism and self-realization. Of all the classical theories considered here, his is the farthest from an ethics of self-interest.

Aristotle (— B.C.E.) Aristotle is a towering figure in ancient Greek philosophy, making contributions to logic, metaphysics, mathematics, physics, biology, botany, ethics, politics, agriculture, medicine, dance and alethamacdonald.com was a student of Plato who in turn studied under Socrates.

He was more empirically-minded than Plato or Socrates and is famous for rejecting Plato's theory .

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The philosophical ethics on friendship from aristotles perspective
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